The Canadian Hemp Trade Alliance (CHTA)

New Address Effective May 4, 2018:                                                                                      Box 70, Bow Island, AB  T0K 0G0                                                                                        Tel. No.:  587 787 0900                                                                                                          Email:  ed@hemptrade.ca

May 11, 2018

Canadian hemp industry achieves record growth:  CHTA to establish full time Executive Director

As the Canadian hemp industry continues to grow, and prospects for the industry are accelerated thanks to the pending changes in Canadian cannabis regulations including the Industrial Hemp Regulations, the Canadian Hemp Trade Alliance (CHTA) has begun a search for a full-time Executive Director.  With a modernized regulatory regime, the agricultural hemp industry is poised to grow to $1 billion in sales by 2023, creating 3,000 new jobs over the next five years.   

According to Russ Crawford, President of the CHTA, “Hemp is coming of age in Canadian agriculture.  The 2017 crop surpassed 130,000 acres for the first time in Canadian history, as Canadian farmers and processors pursue opportunities in the food and fibre markets.  As new regulations open the door for industrial hemp to provide key natural health products to Canadians and globally, our organization is preparing for significant growth.”

“Our organization benefitted from the passion, determination and energy of Kim Shukla as our part-time Executive Director, and we thank her for her tremendous service.  It is time for us to find a new organizational leader on a full time basis and the CHTA Board has launched a search for our next Executive Director,” stated Crawford.   Search details have been distributed nationally and appear on the CHTA website at www.hemptrade.ca.

The Canadian Hemp Trade Association is a not-for-profit organization which represents over 260 growers from 9 out of 10 provinces as well as numerous processors, distributors, developers and researchers involved in Canada’s rapidly growing industrial hemp industry.

For more information, contact:

Russ Crawford, President, Canadian Hemp Trade Alliance

edtemp@hemptrade.ca

587-787-0900

The CHTA is a national organization that promotes Canadian hemp and hemp products globally. Established in 2003 the Alliance represents those involved in Canada’s hemp industry. Members include; farmers, processors, manufacturers, researchers, entrepreneurs and marketers.

The key functions of the Alliance are to disseminate information, promote the use of nutritional and industrial hemp and coordinate research.

CHTA is governed by a Board of Directors.

PRESS RELEASE - MAY 11, 2018:  CHTA SEEKING NEW EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Click here:   CHTA Executive Director Search May 2018

 

JULY 18-19, 2018 IN VANCOUVER,  CANADA

THE GLOBAL HEMP TRADE SYMPOSIUM
The Global Hemp Trade Symposium, an event within the Pacific Rim Hemp Conference, is scheduled for July in Vancouver Canada.  The Symposium is only open to delegates of the Pacific Rim Hemp Conference. Trade Panelists (bios to be added soon) are:
China :  Dr. Liu Xueqiang
Mexico :  TBD
Australia :  TBD - Dr. Ian Brighthope
India:  Rohit Sharma
Europe:  Hana Gabrielova
The panelists will each provide their country's perspective on challenges and opportunities in respect to trade of hemp products.  As a symposium participant, you will have an opportunity for a Q & A with the panelists. 
Following the presentations and Q & A there will be roundtable discussions focused on the issues presented by the panelists. Each table will be asked to provide the Symposium with their list of key opportunities and challenges. It promises to be a lively discussion with an international audience.
Those in attendance will have direct access to market insights and a competitive advantage for their organizations as well; participants will have the opportunity to help shape the Long Term International Strategy for CHTA.

REGISTER HERE:
https://hemptrademb.memberzone.com/eventregistration/register/42  
REMEMBER TO GET YOUR BANQUET TICKET (PRICED SEPARATELY AT $85 PLUS GST)  IF YOU WISH TO NETWORK & CONNECT WITH OTHER DELEGATES!

Register at this link:

http://business.hemptrade.ca/events/details/pacific-rim-hemp-conference-42

PRE-CONFERENCE TOUR AVAILABLE ON FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED BASIS (LIMITED TO 50 DELEGATES ONLY) ! GENEROUSLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY :

           

ITINERARY-HEMP TOUR   

YOU MUST FIRST BE REGISTERED AS A DELEGATE TO JOIN THE TOUR.  
If you are already registered as a Delegate, you may sign up for the Tour here:  http://business.hemptrade.ca/form/view/13634

 

SEE HEALTH CANADA'S  ESTIMATE OF PRODUCTION PERMIT APPLICATIONS FOR 2017:   HC-2017 Stats Report

 Canadian Hemp: A Plant with Opportunity

Since 1998, Canada has grown industrial hemp for seed and for fibre. Canadian farmers and businesses are interested in the growing business of hemp as it realizes its potential to produce healthy food and environmentally friendly products, including paper, textiles, biocomposites and sustainable building materials.

Today Canada’s hemp sector is growing to provide secure supplies of hemp seed and fibre raw materials for domestic and international markets, as well as many processed and conditioned value–added products. Canada’s federal hemp regulations help to create quality, safety and accountability. A supportive scientific research community ensures that essential and necessary research continues ~ critical for any crop.

As a fast–growing annual, hemp is a renewable, reusable and recyclable resource. Changing environments in the world’s business community are helping to turn these green attributes into a valued quality.

Hemp: A Confusing, Historical, and Fascinating Plant

Ancient Origins

Production of hemp originated in Central Asia thousands of years ago. Hemp has a long history of being used as a food grain, and as a source of fibre, such as clothing, rope and netting.

Surprisingly to some, industrial hemp has deep roots in Canada. Hemp was one of the first crops that Champlain planted at Port Royal and later Québec.

Hemp in Canada

In 1606, French Botanist Louis Hebert planted the first hemp crop in North America in Port Royal, Acadia (present–day Nova Scotia). As early as 1801, the Lieutenant Governor of the province of Upper Canada, on behalf of the King of England, distributed hemp seed free to Canadian farmers.

Fibre hemp cultivation continued in many regions to the 20th century. Through many Old World cultures, hemp seed also has a long tradition of in Canada: immigrants from Eastern Europe brought hemp seeds with them when they settled the Prairies. These they planted and used for fresh oil, baking and traditional dishes. Similarly, Chinese Canadians have also long eaten hemp for medicinal and dietary reasons.

In Canada and in the US, hemp was outlawed 70–80 years ago, because it was confused with other kinds of Cannabis. Hemp is often called industrial hemp to distinguish it from other varieties of the plant. In Canada, all commercial hemp strains are grown under science–based regulations to maintain and ensure genetic identity.

After a half century’s absence from Canada’s fields and factories, hemp cultivation was again allowed in 1998, reawakening this country’s relationship to this interesting, fascinating, flexible plant.

Genetic Background

Botanically, hemp is classified as Cannabis sativa L. (Cannabaceae). Cannabis is a diverse plant species including more than 500 different varieties. Marijuana is a distant cousin. Under regulations hemp is defined as having less than 0.3% tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Because of this low level, hemp is unsuitable for drug and therapeutic purposes. THC is by the plant’s epidermal glands and is not produced in the hemp seed. All Industrial Hemp grown in Canada is GMO free.

Hemp is Federally Regulated

Canadian Hemp production was officially discontinued in 1938. In 1994, Health Canada began issuing hemp research licenses again. In March 1998, Health Canada allowed commercial production of the crop under a licensing system. Information on Hemp Regulations can be found at this link on Health Canada’s web site.

Commercial Growth

As with many new crops, there has been considerable fluctuation of production acreage. In 2003, over 2700 hectares (6700 acres) were grown across Canada , mostly concentrated on the Prairies. In 2015 over 84,000 acres licensed for cultivation. Hemp has been grown with success from coast–to–coast.

An Agriculture and Agri–Food Canada backgrounder is at this link.